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Posts Tagged ‘spiritual life’

I have been loving this beautiful rendition of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah,” performed by Sarah Yaseen with the band Kashash. May it be a blessing on your day. Peace be upon each of you.

 

If you have a favorite uplifting song, I invite you to share in the comments.

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6636I have encountered a book lover’s delight for Lent. My favorite new book for the season is Between Midnight and Dawn: A Literary Guide to Prayer for Lent, Holy Week, and Eastertide. When I read the book description, I expect I was bouncing up and down with glee, for I am above all a reader. Nearly any book I pick up could become an opportunity to for prayer, for encounter with God and God’s creation.

I was pleased to note the inclusion of two of my favorite contemporary writers, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Benjamín Alire Sáenz. The mingling of works from across continents and centuries makes for an exceedingly rich reading experience. From Fyodor Dostoevsky to Emily Bronte, Derrick Austin to William Butler Yeats, there are thought-provoking, gorgeous writings in these pages. In addition to encountering favorite authors, I also met several new poets. Sarah Arthur has done an excellent job on this compilation.

Along with poetry and excerpts of prose, each day’s selection offers a suggestion of scripture readings from the Bible. Readers can use the daily offerings as they wish, and will discover plentiful opportunities for lectio divina and reflective reading. There are seven weeks of readings, a list of volumes consulted for possible further reading, brief biographies of contributors, and a detailed index of authors and sources. (This last is critical for me to give such an enthusiastic review.)

A tremendous resource for reflection, Between Midnight and Dawn is the third volume of literary compilations from Sarah Arthur that journey through the church year. Through the Paraclete Press website you also can order an ebook or pdf.

I would like send a reader a paperback copy of Between Midnight and Dawn, courtesy of Paraclete Press. Simply click on the rafflecopter link. You will be asked to comment on this post. I invite you to mention a time when you found unexpected inspiration, whether in literature, art, nature or in another person. Due to shipping, this giveaway is open only to U.S. residents.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Enjoy the lovely book trailer:

I wish each of you a blessed Lent and Eastertide.

Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by the publisher for review purposes. No fee was received.

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7732With Lent quickly approaching, and many people anticipating a season of deepened prayer, a book of fresh reflections on the Psalms is welcome. nourishment. Author Martin Shannon CJ, an Episcopal priest who lives with the Community of Jesus, offers brief reflections to accompany prayers in his Lenten guide According to Your Mercy: Praying with the Psalms from Ash Wednesday to Easter.

Jews and Christians have long used the Psalter as their daily prayer book. Fr. Shannon notes in his introduction that Athanasius of Alexandria has written of the Psalms, “I believe that the whole of human existence, both the dispositions of the soul and the movements of thought, have been measured out and encompassed in those very words of the Psalter.” These prayers are rich and invite personal encounter with the ancient words. Each reflection includes wisdom from church fathers, and at the end of the book there are ten helpful pages that answer the question, “Who are the church fathers quoted in this book?”

Paraclete Press posted an interesting author talk with Fr. Shannon on their facebook page (2/24/17). The video is about 15 minutes long and shares some of Fr. Shannon’s insights on the book of Psalms. You can view a sample from According to Your Mercy (as a pdf file) on the Paraclete Press website. The book also is available as a daily e-book subscription, which can be an excellent reminder to take time daily, even amidst the busyness of life.

It is an undeniable truth that I am drawn to books about the Psalms. Since I often turn to the Psalms for inspiration, I greatly enjoy seeing what other writers have to say about this inexhaustibly rich collection of prayers. Readers will return to this book for spiritual encouragement year after year.

 

Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by the publisher for review purposes and for giveaway. No fee was received.

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Lent begins with Ash Wednesday, which falls on March 1 this year. Do you have special intentions for prayer time during Lent? Will you make an extra effort to serve others? Will you engage in corporate practices, such as attending religious services?

city-of-god2Before Ash Wednesday arrives, I highly recommend finding a copy of City of God: Faith in the Streets by Sara Miles. Author Sara Miles is the director of the food pantry and director of ministry at St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church in San Francisco. With this book Sara Miles takes us through her reflections on the meanings of Ash Wednesday, the richness of community, the call to share blessings and sorrows. She reminds us that the call to love one another spills out into the streets, into the shop on the corner, into hospital hallways. We are called on this day to face our mortality together, and to show mercy to one another.

For the church Ash Wednesday offers a particular opportunity to practice repentance. As Sara Miles writes, “Repentance requires paying attention to others, and learning to love, even a little bit, what God loves so much: the whole screwed-up world, this holy city, the people God created to be his own.” I reviewed this excellent book here on my blog, and I invite you to please check out the review.

Your comments about favorite Lenten practices are welcome. Peace be upon you as you walk your path.

 

 

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978-1-62698-139-3This year Ash Wednesday, and the beginning of the season of Lent, falls on February 10. In this period leading up to Easter many Christians observe a season of reflection, repentance, and renewal. While specific customs vary widely among denominations, all people can benefit from taking time for prayer.

For daily spiritual reading during Lent I intend to draw nourishment from All Shall Be Well: Readings for Lent and Easter. A powerful collection of writings from poets, activists, and religious sisters and brothers, this volume from Orbis Books includes voices who speak for peace, caring for the needy, and uplifting the weak.

I do not want to give a litany of the authors, but the table of contents, with writers both classic (Howard Thurman) and contemporary (Mary Lou Kownacki), had me quite excited. In particular I enjoyed the words of Julia Alvarez, Dorothy Day, Virgil Elizondo, and Daniel Berrigan. The selections are numbered but not dated, since the dates for Lent vary; this thoughtful format will make the book easier to use year after year.

All Shall Be Well will make an inspiring and uplifting companion. I encourage you to find a copy, and may you have a blessed, prayer-filled Lent.

Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by the publisher for review purposes. No fee was received.

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The Syrian people have been living in crisis for several years, and their situation continues to worsen. In recent weeks the overwhelming challenges facing refugees and internally displaced persons have been in the news with greater regularity, due in part to sorrowful stories of deaths while en route to seek sanctuary in Europe. Many countries that should be hosting people in need are, instead, tightening their borders.

We are meant to carry each other, to show compassion, to reach out with love to those in need. If you are looking for a way to contribute financial resources, I highly recommend reading about the work of Mercy Corps.

Many ordinary citizens are reaching out and trying to offer assistance, urging their governments to adopt humane and welcoming policies. This morning I read of the first refugees arriving not far from my home in southeastern Pennsylvania. In my area, Church World Service is one of the agencies coordinating welcome for Syrian families.

While watching this news unfold, I have been revisiting a beautiful book I reviewed on this blog, The Other Face of God: When the stranger calls us home. I am re-posting the review here in its entirety.

In The Other Face of God, Mary Jo Leddy shares stories of her life at Romero House, a home for people who are, for now, refugees seeking a new home. Her stories describe the lives of individuals with whom she has lived, and out of her experiences a theology of neighborliness and justice emerges. How does the stranger “calls us home”? In Leddy’s words, “Living in the shelter of each other, we begin to live in the neighborhood of God.” This is a powerful book, full of passion and deep faith. As I read, the prophet Micah’s words rang in my heart: “What does the Lord require of you, but to do justice, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God?”

Through living in Romero House in Toronto for more than twenty years, Leddy has built relationships not only with those living in her house, but in the neighborhood. In building relationships with Romero House residents, Leddy has experienced the critical importance of respecting individual people, not treating people as a “cause” or an “issue.” Strangers can become neighbors when we learn to truly see one another. The distance between “us” and “them” disappears when people work alongside one another to plant a garden, to plan a party, to care for the needy in their midst.

Borders and boundaries between people do not need to be viewed as barriers. Rather, they can be meeting places. When we meet in a spirit of compassion, that meeting place can be full of the Holy Spirit. In Leddy’s view, a Christian should not try “to see Christ in the poor,” but to recognize that the spirit of Christ lives along the border—between you and I, between one and another, wherever compassion meets suffering.

Her narrative addresses the harsh and discouraging realities that people who are living without a country must face. The bureaucratic hurdles for those seeking residency and employment are many, and indifferent to individuality. I appreciated that Leddy drew upon Hannah Arendt‘s analysis of bureaucratic systems, and I think she did so in a way that would be very clear for readers without background in political philosophy. As a counter to the indifference of systems, people of faith are called to love our “enemies.” Leddy provides an insightful analysis of the ways that governments can turn “strangers” into “enemies” to further their political agendas.

Through her life and her writing, Leddy offers a powerful call for the works of mercy to be given “a place of privilege” in religious communities. Like the merciful Samaritan in Luke 10, we must help the stranger in need. We must be willing to truly see the face of a stranger, rather than a “problem,” and to allow compassion to emerge. We must remember that the parable ends with the command of Jesus that we “go and do likewise.”

Amidst the diversity of religious beliefs and places of origin, “perhaps there is only one distinction that matters: those who are learning to love their neighbors and those who remain indifferent to them.”

Mary Jo Leddy’s The Other Face of God: When the stranger calls us home was published by Orbis Books in 2011.

Disclaimer: This review is freely given. No fee was received.

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532945_10207362262240698_5530050580359190562_nThe health of our bodies is deeply intertwined with the health of our communities. In the U.S., we know the level of unhealthy living has reached crisis level, yet the problem can feel insurmountable. Restoring health to our communities requires not only institutional support, but also spiritual strength and a solid dose of inspiration. The latest work from author Stanley Porter, a Boston-based musician, minister, and inspirational speaker, will be a blessing to communities in need. Written with personal trainer Nikquisa Nunn, The Weight is Over: My Journey toward Faith, Fitness, and Freedom addresses the deep emotional and spiritual challenges that stand as obstacles to wellness.

As Porter says in a video for this book, “I’m hoping that we can hold hands through this book and help each other be all that we were created to be.” There is power in sharing our stories of overcoming challenges and emerging stronger. The testimonies of Nunn and Porter bring encouragement and hope.

With the aim of bringing their lessons into communities, where people can immediately receive inspiration and turn toward wellness, Nunn and Porter are raising funds for outreach. You can directly support their efforts, and receive a pre-release copy of The Weight is Over.

An official book release celebration in Boston is scheduled for July 25, 1-3:00, at Frugal Bookstore in the Roxbury Mall.

For another opportunity to read Porter’s inspirational words, I recommend Every Song Has a Story, which I reviewed here.

Disclaimer: This review is freely given, and no fee was received. I know Stanley Porter from my youth, when we attended high school together.

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